Feed the Future
This project is part of the U.S. Government's global hunger and food security initiative.
In the past few decades, there has been a growing demand for fish (wild-caught and aquaculture), especially in developing countries, due to increased knowledge of their health benefits, urbanization and rising incomes. The blog details how to ensure fish food safety is prioritized as fish demand increases.
Are you working on an emergency or development project engaged in agriculture, livelihoods, or WASH activities? The USAID Food for Peace-funded SCALE and PRO-WASH awards are currently conducting a survey to better understand the opportunities and challenges facing implementing partners in emergency...
In this post, learn how different types of standards and regulations work in practice and the complementary roles they each play in mitigating food safety threats.
The fall armyworm is becoming a household name around the world, but not for good reasons – the pest, native to the tropical and subtropical Americas, devours over 300 plant species, including maize, which feeds millions of people .
Climate Services for Resilient Development (CSRD) is a USAID-supported global partnership that connects climate and environmental science with data streams to generate decision support tools and training for decision-makers in developing countries. The CSRD consortium in South Asia is led by the...
Ethiopian farmers have a name for Parthenium hysterophorus : “Faramsissa,” meaning, “sign your land away.” The name is fitting – Parthenium wipes out biodiversity, reduces crop yields, causes human health issues, and taints milk when consumed by livestock.
Market opportunities attract agricultural investors, and industry support initiatives incentivize them to navigate through inevitable difficulties, but ultimately, a strong enabling environment is what sustains and expands private investment.
More than 50 years ago, CGIAR’s research into high-yielding, disease-resistant rice and wheat launched the Green Revolution, saving more than a billion people from starvation.
As horticulture for development becomes an increasingly critical field globally, these nine webinars off early-career professionals a chance to brush up on both project management skills and horticulture topics related to the contexts of international agricultural development.
In the past few decades, there has been a growing demand for fish (wild-caught and aquaculture), especially in developing countries, due to increased knowledge of their health benefits, urbanization and rising incomes. The blog details how to ensure fish food safety is prioritized as fish demand increases.
This infomational sheet may be downloaded and shared widely. It shows statistics about some of the gender issues related to smallholder farmers in developing and emerging countries, and it highlights how to empower women in particular.
Are you working on an emergency or development project engaged in agriculture, livelihoods, or WASH activities? The USAID Food for Peace-funded SCALE and PRO-WASH awards are currently conducting a survey to better understand the opportunities and challenges facing implementing partners in emergency...
In this post, learn how different types of standards and regulations work in practice and the complementary roles they each play in mitigating food safety threats.
The fall armyworm is becoming a household name around the world, but not for good reasons – the pest, native to the tropical and subtropical Americas, devours over 300 plant species, including maize, which feeds millions of people .
Climate Services for Resilient Development (CSRD) is a USAID-supported global partnership that connects climate and environmental science with data streams to generate decision support tools and training for decision-makers in developing countries. The CSRD consortium in South Asia is led by the...
Ethiopian farmers have a name for Parthenium hysterophorus : “Faramsissa,” meaning, “sign your land away.” The name is fitting – Parthenium wipes out biodiversity, reduces crop yields, causes human health issues, and taints milk when consumed by livestock.
Market opportunities attract agricultural investors, and industry support initiatives incentivize them to navigate through inevitable difficulties, but ultimately, a strong enabling environment is what sustains and expands private investment.
Bolstering intra-African agriculture trade is an opportunity to both spur economic growth as well as to increase access to safe, nutritious foods across borders. In this piece, learn how programming can create an enabling environment that supports these goals.